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Here’s a NYT comment that really says what I believe. This belief of mine has been percolating over the past couple years and represents, I suppose, a turn away from the left but it’s still on the left side of the political spectrum. Anyway, here it is:

gumnaam nowhere 14 hours ago

Senator Sanders, much respect to you, but what about the election in France? A center-right candidate walloped the far right candidate. The main difference: the inability of the Russians to interfere.

The Democratic party is a big-tent party, and cannot function well with ideological purity tests. Policies also have to be achievable, which means listening to all stakeholders. The Democratic sweep in 2006-2008 did not come about because of following a rigid ideological prescription. The Democrats will win by being the party of good governance with new talented candidates across the ideological spectrum. It is well past time to stop beating on people on your own side, and start focusing your ire on the real problem: the Republicans.

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It’s the second paragraph above that really resonates with me. And especially the very last sentence which states the real problem: the Republicans.

The comment comes from an op-ed by Bernie Sanders in the NYT today: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/13/opinion/bernie-sanders-how-democrats-can-stop-losing-elections.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=opinion-c-col-right-region&region=opinion-c-col-right-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-right-region

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Here’s a comment predicting the political future given the Republicans’ take over of both branches of congress:

Mary Ann & Ken Bergman Ashland, OR 3 hours ago
Now that Republicans fully control both houses of Congress, the chances increase that they’ll overreach in their zealous fervor to do everything they can to make President Obama a failure. There will be bills passed that they know the President will veto. There will be further blockage of his executive and judiciary appointments. And there will be a raft of Congressional hearings on the “scandals,” real or imagined, of the Obama administration. They may play their game of bluff over the federal budget, even though they’ll likely get the blame if the government is shut down. If certain Republicans have their way, there will be impeachment proceedings, even though Republicans don’t have the necessary two-thirds of the Senate in their pocket. It’s going to be a time of high theater, although little if any legislation is likely to be enacted.

So the President is wise to act, to the extent that he can, to carry out needed actions by executive orders. Unfortunately, they’re likely to be challenged in the courts, effectively tying them up for months or years in the legal process. The Republicans will use every means at their disposal to prevent the Obama administration from moving forward on important issues.

The level of mean-spiritedness of today’s Republicans is likely to become even more apparent to the public and turn them off. But Democrats are not faultless; they need to push progressive programs that help all of us, and stop being “Republican-Lite.”

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It will be interesting to look at this a year from now and see how things turned out.

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Here’s the link.

There are a lot of good comments on this announcement in the New York Times.

Here’s a couple:

boygabe Brooklyn, NY

If the USPS were a company, they wouldn’t have to adhere to an idiotic law requiring them to pay into future retiree benefits at such high amounts. No private company is subject to such financial burdens.

However, Republicans seek to destroy the USPS, so they enacted these laws specifically to bankrupt the USPS.

It’s working exactly as they wanted.

Yet another public service slowly being destroyed by Congress.

In reply to Eduardo Angel Feb. 6, 2013 at 9:46 a.m.
You recommended this 76

Rosa H……….. Tarrytown

This is just the beginning of what the Republicans would like to do to government. The idea that the richest country in the world can’t afford postal service is absurd. The problem the postal service faces is easily resolved. Congressional legislation forced it to fund its retiree pension shortfall within three years. (Private companies get 20-30 years). As a result of the billions that “reform” cost, the USPS is broke. If our so-called representatives took a tiny step out of their ideological straitjackets and used common sense, the USPS would not be running a deficit, and our postal service would not be slowly disappearing.

Just guess what will happen to prices and service when FedEx and UPS end up in control of the market. For starters, watch to see how much FedEx Saturday delivery prices go up.

Feb. 6, 2013 at 10:08 a.m. You recommended this 48

These comments say it better than I could. The bottom line is that if this country doesn’t wake up and vote the Republicans out of office, this country will become a third world country, and it may be this already! You can see that I’m mad….. Right?

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The NYT this morning has a scathing editorial on the pettiness of John Boehner’s refusal to allow Obama to make his jobs speech on Wednesday, Sept. 7, and they accuse Obama of caving once again by agreeing to give his speech on the following day. I think I agree that Obama caved yet again, but then I find the following reader’s comment:

Really? This delay, even seen as a concession to a request, however churlish, from another elected representative of considerable stature (i.e., the Speaker of the House) is seen as “caving” or some sort of sign of weakness? Was Lincoln’s willingness to wait patiently to meet with General George B. McClellan, the general-in-chief of the Union Army at the early stages of the Civil War (and, later, his Democratic rival for re-election as President) also “caving” or weakness?

What has happened to the notion that it is the stronger, more mature, and more self-possessed individual and leader who can overlook – much less ignore – such pettiness and posturing, keeping his (or her) eye on the more important issues and goals of good governance and the communication of one’s vision and plans for the same?

Or are virtues such as patience, restraint, and forbearance (yes, even towards the small, the petty, and, dare I say it, “those who hate you”) of no value and are no longer desired in our leaders, much less our President and Commander-in-Chief?

OK, this is all well and good. Clearly, Lincoln showed forbearance and maturity and became one of our very greatest presidents. But look what Obama is up against:

I don’t know how true this is, but on The Ed Show (granted hardly an unbiased source) it was said that the Obama people sent the request early in the morning, and that Boehner hesitated in replying to the President, until after Rush Limbaugh went on the air and on the warpath and publicly berated Boehner for not turning down the President’s request immediately. It seems the Republicans in office are so beholden (again, if this is true) to such non-elected personalities as Limbaugh, Beck and Grover Norquist that they cannot act independently on their own. In fact, if you include the astroturf groups such as The Club for Growth and Freedomworks, it seems elected Republicans are no better than lemmings marching to the drumbeat of corporate-funded advocacy groups and media individuals.Not to let Obama off the hook, because he backed down again, but the Republican have no intention of showing respect for the office of the President as long as their leadership-in-fact is a bunch of astroturf groups and rich individuals, especially Rush Limbaugh. I can’t believe so many poor and middle-class individuals are taken in by a rich man who flaunts a golden microphone, and how many politicians, including the one who is second in the line to the presidency, are beholden to him.

Is this equivalent to what Lincoln was up against? It may have been worse in Lincoln’s time but at least then there was no instant media to excite the masses.

The first quote was by William Gabriel of Ann Arbor, Michigan, and the second was by r5169 of Midwestern U.S.A.

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Especially these House Republicans, or should I say Repuglicans? Eric Cantor is the number one worst person of the Repuglican world. This outburst of mine here was prompted by reading this DialyKos article: Obama to call for transportation reauthorization without cuts.

The article points out that Obama will be joined by representatives of two organizations that are very rarely on the same side, namely, the AFL-CIO and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. This still probably won’t be enough to satisfy that creep Cantor because his only objective is to defeat Obama.

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This is from the comment section of the NYT article today by David Brooks titled “It’s Not About You”. It’s a comment by a William Taylor of Nampa, ID, and it rang a bell with me.

As Robert Cole pointed out in his “Habits of the Heart” America entered its individualist era during the early to mid eighteen-hundreds, as documented by de Alexis de Tocqueville in his famous book chronicaling his journey among the American people. The visitor from France wondered what would happen. I think he is the one who first coined the word “individualism,” describing a pattern in which the horizon is finally reduced to “me.”

The main thing lost due to the triumph of individualism has been a sense of the common good. Democrats still have some allegiance to the idea, as illustrated by their continued concern for social welfare and the supportive role of government. The Republicans (David Brooks is a good example) have always been suspicious of this idea, but their almost religious individualism really took over with Reagan and now reigns supreme thanks to the libertarians and the Tea Party. The Ryan budget is a good example of individualism’s rotten fruit.

In philosophy, they talk about a “reductio ad absurdum,” the condition that exists when the fallacy of an idea finally reaches its ultimate point of absurdity. With the ongoing financial debacle…the loss of cheap oil…and climate change, we face huge problems that can only be solved when “I” becomes a “we.” The prognosis is not good.

That’s right. The prognosis is not good.

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The NYT has a great editorial today, Mississippi’s Ballot Trick, and this is one of the 150 comments so far, an editor’s pick:Wow, what a shock! Republicans trying to rig an election! Since the 2000 election, which saw the Supreme Court violate the law to stop the vote counting and appoint our President, we’ve discovered voter rolls purged of legitimate (democratic) voters, voter challenges, voter caging lists, voter registrations thrown in the trash, letters sent to the homes of voters to mis-inform them of the election date, phone banks jammed to prevent voters from contacting campaign offices for rides to the polls, students told they can’t vote in the districts where they attend school, and of course the continued use of notoriously flawed touch screen, paperless, voting machines which flip votes, lose votes, crash, and were invented to throw elections to the republicans. Has there been any serious investigation of these tactics by the mainstream media? Only now you’re offended? Eight long and tragic years late, but better late than never, though not by much.

— Kenneth D. Brown, Redondo Beach, CA

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